Post

3 followers Follow
Avatar
0

Differences between BookWright and Lightroom's Book module?

Hi, everyone. Can some of you please explain what are the key differences between using the standalone BookWright app and the Book module in Lightroom 5? What are the advantages and disadvantages to either approach? Thanks!

David Collett

Post is closed for comments.

4 comments

Avatar
0

Hi David. Since Lightroom not only has a bookmaking module but also has image editing and cataloging features, there are *many* differences--too many to make a comprehensive list, frankly!

Here are few main points to consider--not an exhaustive list but enough to get you started.

  • Lightroom allows you to make edits to your images (color, brightness, etc) within the same program, and for those changes to automatically update. BookWright does not have the ability to make such edits. You would need to edit them outside of BookWright and the (re)place those edited images into BookWright. 
  • BookWright allows you to make Magazines, ebooks and also Trade books (5x8, 6x9 and 8x10) while Lightroom does not. 
  • BookWright offers free ISBNs for your books. If you want an ISBN in your Lightroom book you would need to supply your own. 
  • Lightroom must be purchased while BookWright is free.
  • If your plan is to make photo books, then either would work well. If you also need a way to edit your images and catalog them, Lightroom would be a good choice. If you plan to write a novel or other text-heavy book in a magazine format or Trade format, then BookWright is what you'll want!

I hope that helps you get started. You might want to download both (Lightroom has a trial version) and try them out.

 

Michael Y. 0 votes
Avatar
0

Michael, thanks very much for taking the time to point out some of the differences. That helps.

A followup question: Because printers use CMYK and LR doesn't, an article that I read online suggested that we should use Photoshop to proof using Blurb's CMYK profile, then use these Photoshop-adjusted versions for our Blurb book in order to get accurate colors.

What's your opinion concerning this? Thanks!

David

David Collett 0 votes
Avatar
0

Hi David. Sorry for the delayed reply. That is the only way to softproof if using Lightroom at this time. However, for most users soft-proofing really isn't absolutely necessary--just know that saturated colors may shift towards printable, less saturated colors and if you're really concerned you might want to make a small 7x7 test book of your favorite images. Most images come out fine though...I actually see more issues with dark images than with out-of-gamut images. Check the dark images section in this series if you're curious. 

Michael Y. 0 votes

Community is not available in this language

Help Center